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Supplemental Course Descriptions

Spring 2020

ENGL 2002W Advanced Expository Writing: Business Writing
Saturday 10:10AM – 12:50PM Dr. Fran Shaw
Requirement(s) Met: A limited number of writing courses can count toward the English major (Category C.2). This course satisfies a GenEd W requirement and counts for the BGS Arts/Humanities theme and English minor.

Writing effective letters, memos, proposals, reports, press releases, and other business documents. Sharpening skills so all writing is clear and error-free.

ENGL 2020 - Major Works of English and American Literature
Tuesday, Thursday 12:30PM - 1:45PM Prof. Pamela Brown
Content Area: CA1
Requirement(s) Met: Engl 1616 counts for a GenEd Category 1b requirement. 
Perquisite(s): Engl 1010 or 1011

Many major works in English have endured violent attacks for being subversive, immoral, and dangerous. Nothing is truly sacred: the English Bible and Shakespeare have been censored and banned at various times, for various reasons. As we explore this phenomenon, we'll read and discuss selections from Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice, Whitman's Leaves of Grass, Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes were Watching God, Allen Ginsberg's Howl, and Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, among other works. We will study the ways these writers used literary forms and resources of genre to create works of lasting power. Required: midterm and final, and weekly short responses on readings. Students will also work together on directed topics.

ENGL 2110 - British Literature II
Monday 3:35PM – 6:05PM Prof. Frederick Roden
Content Area: CA1
Requirement(s) Met: Engl 2101 counts for the English major B1 requirement and elective credit; the English minor; and GenEd 1b.
Perquisite(s): Engl 1010 or 1011 or equivalent

British Literature II examines a broad variety of genres (poetry, non-fiction prose, and novel/short story) in three historical periods, from 1800 to roughly 1950: Romanticism, Victorianism, and Modernism. We will pay particular attention to works and movements on the margins of these categorical terms. This era was one of tremendous change with respect to definitions of identity: race, class, gender, sexual orientation, national and ethnic self-understanding, and religion -- just to name a few. We will analyze the literature in the context of the politics of identity and the idea of "subjectivity": the speaking self.

ENGL 3503 - Shakespeare I
Tuesday, Thursday 12:30PM - 1:45PM Prof. Pamela Brown
Requirement(s) Met: Engl 3503W counts for English major D requirement, for major elective credit, and as a pre-1800 distribution; for the English minor; and as a GenEd W competency. 
Perquisite(s): Engl 1010 or 1011

"All the world's a stage, / And all the men and women merely players." This bit of wisdom from As You Like It is a perfect cue for a student of Shakespeare. In this course, you will actively participate in learning about the world he creates in major comedies and tragedies including Midsummer Night's Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, and Othello. For each play we'll examine the historical and literary contexts, resources of language, and stage conventions. Often the class will form groups and rehearse and perform a scene. If possible, the class will also attend a professional production. In this writing-intensive course you will complete 15 pages of revised writing; a midterm, and a final presentation based on research.

ENGL 3629 – Holocaust Literature
Tuesday 5:30PM – 8:00PM, Prof. Frederick Roden
Content Area: CA1., CA4-INT
Requirement(s) Met: For pre-2017 catalog years, this course satisfies the English major B3 requirement and diversity distribution; it otherwise counts for a major elective, international requirement in the Teaching concentration, and the English minor.
For GenEd, it satisfies Category 1b and Content 4-International requirements.
Prerequisite(s): Engl 1010 or 1011 or equivalent, or permission of instructor

This course concerns the notion of "survival" and "survivors" broadly conceived. Even as we contemplate the atrocity of genocide, hope and endurance serve as our recurring themes. We will interrogate the meanings of “altruism,” “rescue,” “resistance” and "humanitarianism" – and “survival” -- at individual and collective levels. What do studies of "survival" teach us about community and human relationships? What does it mean to create “art from the ashes”? In studying literature as the work of memory, we will explore how trauma shapes identity and consider the commitment to write, to document the “unspeakable.” We will read a variety of genres, including diary, memoir, poetry, and fiction. All of these forms share an absolute imperative – at times even a compulsion – to tell their story. How do we (in E. M. Forster's words) "only connect"? How do we survive?

ENGL 3703 Writing Workshop: Magazine Writing
Friday 10:10AM – 12:40PM Dr. Fran Shaw

Writing entertaining, informative, and creative non-fiction articles for print or online magazines. We experiment with writing humor, gripe, memoir, interview, reviews, and freelance articles on topics of greatest interest to the writer. Just email the professor for a permission number so you can register; all are welcome.

FREN 1102 Elementary French II 
Tuesday, Thursday 12:30PM - 2:15PM, Dr. Kathleen Jarchow 
Prerequisite(s): Elementary French 1 

Continuation of FREN 1101. Review and extension of French grammar. Graded composition. Intensive and extensive reading. Intensive oral practice. Cultural and social content reinforce the linguistic skills taught in every class.
In addition to consistent exposure in the target language, the FREN 1102 curriculum includes the tools and exercises that each student may use to take the French international diploma at the conclusion of the course. The “Diplôme d'études en langue française” or ‘DELF’ is a diploma awarded by the French Ministry of Education to prove the French-language skills on an international level. This component of the course is particularly attractive if students are pursuing international business, science or engineering undergraduate degrees.

FREN 1104 Intermediate French II 
Tuesday, Thursday 3:30PM - 5:15PM, Dr. Kathleen Jarchow 
Prerequisite(s): Intermediate French 1 

Continuation of FREN 1103. Review and extension of French grammar. Graded composition. Intensive and extensive reading. Intensive oral practice. Authentic French texts accompany the course materials serving to reinforce the cultural, social and linguistic aspects going beyond the classroom. In addition to consistent exposure in the target language, the FREN 1104 curriculum includes the tools and exercises that each student may use to take the French international diploma at the conclusion of the course. The “Diplôme d'études en langue française” or ‘DELF’ is a diploma awarded by the French Ministry of Education to prove the French-language skills on an international level. This component of the course is particularly attractive if students are pursuing international business, science or engineering undergraduate degrees.

NUSC 2200 Nutrition and Human Development
Saturday 10:00AM – 12:40PM, Dr. Lora Sporny
Perquisite(s): NUSC 1165 is recommended but not required

Nutrition and Human Development focuses on the physiologic changes and nutritional needs during pregnancy, fetal development, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Special attention is devoted to healthful eating during pregnancy and lactation, human milk versus infant formulas, introduction of solid foods to infants, coping with picky eating, maintaining an appropriate feeding relationship between caregiver and child, pediatric food allergies, and promoting health and preventing dietary problems in children and adolescents.

POLS 2998 Political Issues: Democracy and Democratization
Tuesday, Thursday 3:30PM – 4:45PM Prof. Yonatan Morse

What is democracy? Where does democracy come from? Why do some democracies fall apart? These questions have preoccupied philosophers and social scientists for generations and are the subjects of our inquiry in this course. The late 20th century witnessed an immense expansion of freedom, voting rights, and elections across much of the world, collectively known as the "Third Wave" of democratization. However, in recent years, scholars have noted a troubling trend of democratic erosion and decline, including in the United States. Democracy is increasingly challenged by forces of populism and authoritarianism. In this class we debate different meanings of democracy, present different ways that democracies can organize, and assess different theories of democratic growth and decline.

PSYC 3889 - Reading Program
Wednesday 11:15AM – 12:10PM, Donald Takacs
Recommended for sophomores, juniors, seniors

This undergraduate research course is a reading internship in which students work with children who are at-risk for reading disabilities. UConn students attend a weekly seminar which addresses the relationship between psycholinguistic research and phonics-based reading instruction. Throughout the semester tutors meet with three children twice a week for ½ hour of one-on-one instruction. These two 90 minute tutor sessions are held in the morning at a Stamford school or after school in Stamford or Norwalk. The UConn student chooses the tutor days and the venue, which remain the same throughout the semester.

SOCI 3453 Women and Health
Tuesday, Thursday 3:30PM – 4:45PM Ingrid Semaan

This course begins with the premise that health outcomes are embedded in inequalities that are located at the intersection of gender/race/class/sexuality. We will look at research that focuses on three additional themes: a critique of the profit motive in health care, a critique of the emphasis on pharmaceuticals and technology in medical fields, and a critique of the biomedical model. We will focus on several specific areas of health including reproductive health, mental health, eating “disorders,” and body size. We will explore these topics through films, reading assignments, and class discussions.
***This course counts toward the minor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. The minor requires just five or six courses. Only one may be at the 1000 level. Contact ingrid.semaan@uconn.edu for more information***

WGSS 1105 Gender and Sexuality in Everyday Life
Tuesday, Thursday 2:00PM – 3:15PM
Content Area: CA2, CA4

This course examines the social forces that influence people’s lives. We will contrast the idea that gender is fixed and/or biologically determined with the view that gender is variable and produced in social relationships. A central theme of this course is that race, class, and sexuality intersect with gender relations to produce difference and inequality. We will also look at the ways that collective action can and does change gender/race/class/sexuality within the social structure. Topics covered in this class will include work, intimate relationships, government policies, gender identity, sexuality, and social movements. We will explore these topics through films, reading assignments, and class discussions.
***This course counts toward the minor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. The minor requires just 5 or 6 courses. Only one may be at the 1000 level. Contact ingrid.semaan@uconn.edu for more information.***

WGSS 3105 Politics of Reproduction
Wednesday 3:35PM - 6:05PM, Ms. Rhea Hirshman
Perquisite(s): Prior WGSS or relevant history course

Not simply a biological function, human reproduction has been layered with meaning throughout history. On one hand, this course is an exploration of the meanings — mediated by race, class, sexuality, religion, physical health/ability, and other factors — attributed to giving birth. On the other, it is an examination of factors that make this deeply personal act “political” — and of the impact of institutions like government and religion on our private lives. Among the topics: childbirth, motherhood, adoption, contraception, abortion, surrogacy, and the ethical quandaries raised by reproductive technologies.

Past Semesters